• Bridge Ladies

    Bridge Ladies Sometimes I think a meteor could strike the earth and wipe out mankind with the exception of my mother’s Bridge club — Roz, Bea, Bette, Rhoda, and Jackie — five Jewish octogenarians who continue to gather for lunch and Bridge on Mondays as they have for over fifty years. When I set out to learn about the women behind the matching outfits and accessories, I never expected to fall in love with them. This is the story of the ladies, their game, and most of all the ragged path that led me back to my mother.
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Electra

Front seat to a conversation at Lincoln Center between Sidney Lumet and his daughter Jenny, the author of one of my favorite movies of last year, “Rachel Getting Married.” I don’t think I have to list Lumet’s movies but just a few: “12 Angry Men”, “Dog Day Afternoon”,”Network”, “Serpico”, etc.

 My dad always wanted me to go into his business. The problem was that it was the lumber business. Though I can’t imagine it’s easy being the daughter of a living legend. Of course, Lumet the father did allow as to how he didn’t help Jenny at all with her movie apart from giving it to Jonathan [Demme].

She told the story behind the famous dishwasher scene in “Rachel Getting Married.” She was about eight years old when Bob Fosse visited their East Hampton house, at least I think it was the Hamptons.  Anyway, he came over, very elegant in his black cashmere slacks, t, and sweater loosely tied around his shoulders. Taking a long drag off a cigarette, he said to Sidney, “You know, if you load the Zabar’s container on the top you’ll get 20% more dishes in there.” Apparently, it escalated from there. “Bob was very competitive,” Sidney weighed in, loading methods no laughing matter, then or now.

I loved hearing him talk about working with actors (Hepburn, Fonda, Brando), about his love of digital cameras, about lenses and technical matters. Or when he picked at  his scalp, readjusted his glasses and said, “You’re constantly telling a story,” or, on actors, “It’s easy to disguise what you are, but you can’t hide it,” or, in giving it back to critics in general, and Pauline Kael in particular, “You want the artistic experience without the artistic risk.”

I miss my dad.

2 Responses

  1. Yours is the only enjoyable agent blog.

  2. […] Lerner. Electra. (How did Bob Fosse influence the dishwasher loading scene in “Rachel’s Getting […]

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